Truth is subjectivity kierkegaard essay

Postmodernism is "post" because it is denies the existence of any ultimate principles, and it lacks the optimism of there being a scientific, philosophical, or religious truth which will explain everything for everybody - a characterisitic of the so-called "modern" mind. The paradox of the postmodern position is that, in placing all principles under the scrutiny of its skepticism, it must realize that even its own principles are not beyond questioning. As the philospher Richard Tarnas states, postmodernism "cannot on its own principles ultimately justify itself any more than can the various metaphysical overviews against which the postmodern mind has defined itself."

Social constructivism holds that truth is constructed by social processes, is historically and culturally specific, and that it is in part shaped through the power struggles within a community. Constructivism views all of our knowledge as "constructed," because it does not reflect any external "transcendent" realities (as a pure correspondence theory might hold). Rather, perceptions of truth are viewed as contingent on convention, human perception, and social experience. It is believed by constructivists that representations of physical and biological reality, including race , sexuality , and gender , are socially constructed.

Historically, white supremacy has venerated the idea of objectivity, and wielded a dichotomy of ‘subjectivity vs. objectivity’ as a means of silencing oppressed peoples. The idea that there is a single truth–’the Truth’–is a construct of the Euro-West that is deeply rooted in the Enlightenment, which was a movement that also described Black and Brown people as both subhuman and impervious to pain. This construction is a myth and white supremacy, imperialism, colonization, capitalism, and the United States of America are all of its progeny. The idea that the truth is an entity for which we must search, in matters that endanger our abilities to exist in open spaces, is an attempt to silence oppressed peoples.

Photorealism was a style of painting that appeared in the late 1960s, in which subjects (people or urban scenes) are painted in a highly detailed manner, resembling photographs. Most practitioners work directly from photographs or digital computer imagery, and the subject matter is quite banal and of no special interest. Instead the real focus is on the precision and detail achieved by the artist, and its impact on the viewer. Photographic realism was largely inspired by Pop-Art - banal subject-matter was common to both, and certain artists (eg. Malcolm Morley and Mel Ramos) used both styles. however Photo-Realism lacks Pop-Art's whimsical or ironic humour, and can even be faintly disturbing. What's more, paradoxically, its microscopic, indiscriminate detail can actually create a slightly "unreal" effect. Leading members of the Super-Realist movement include Richard Estes - who specializes in street scenes containing complex glass-reflections - and Chuck Close , who excels at monumental pictures of expressionless faces. Other Hyper-Realist painters include Robert Bechtle, Audrey Flack, Ralph Goings and John Doherty . Hyperrealist sculptors include Duane Hanson (1925-96), John de Andrea (), Carole Feuerman (), Ron Mueck and Robert Gober.

The world is filled with the humanistic philosophy that says we can do anything we put our minds to doing, if only we believe, and are persistent and committed. Many are the “motivators” who presume to better their pocketbooks and society, invariably in that order. This philosophy, in savory ways to the ego of man, brushes aside all recognition of God and His sovereignty. It brushes aside the concepts of sin, of the consequence of breaking God’s laws, of the supremely needful sacrifice of the shed blood of Jesus Christ for our deliverance from bondage, and of repentance from sin, the wilful independence from God. In essence, the preaching of the innate power to do whatever we will if we choose, apart from Jesus Christ, renders Him a fool and His work nothing better than a good example of “positive thinking.” In considerable detail, we refute this philosophy.

Truth is subjectivity kierkegaard essay

truth is subjectivity kierkegaard essay

Photorealism was a style of painting that appeared in the late 1960s, in which subjects (people or urban scenes) are painted in a highly detailed manner, resembling photographs. Most practitioners work directly from photographs or digital computer imagery, and the subject matter is quite banal and of no special interest. Instead the real focus is on the precision and detail achieved by the artist, and its impact on the viewer. Photographic realism was largely inspired by Pop-Art - banal subject-matter was common to both, and certain artists (eg. Malcolm Morley and Mel Ramos) used both styles. however Photo-Realism lacks Pop-Art's whimsical or ironic humour, and can even be faintly disturbing. What's more, paradoxically, its microscopic, indiscriminate detail can actually create a slightly "unreal" effect. Leading members of the Super-Realist movement include Richard Estes - who specializes in street scenes containing complex glass-reflections - and Chuck Close , who excels at monumental pictures of expressionless faces. Other Hyper-Realist painters include Robert Bechtle, Audrey Flack, Ralph Goings and John Doherty . Hyperrealist sculptors include Duane Hanson (1925-96), John de Andrea (), Carole Feuerman (), Ron Mueck and Robert Gober.

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