Mending wall poem essay

If we substitute for a frog a "Mr. Goodwill" or a "Mr. Prudence," and for the scorpion "Mr. Treachery" or "Mr. Two-Face," and make the river any river and substitute for "We're both Arabs . . ." "We're both men . ." we turn the fable [which illustrates human tendencies by using animals as illustrative examples] into an allegory [a narrative in which each character and action has symbolic meaning]. On the other hand, if we turn the frog into a father and the scorpion into a son (boatman and passenger) and we have the son say "We're both sons of God, aren't we?", then we have a parable (if a rather cynical one) about the wickedness of human nature and the sin of parricide. (22)

One cannot discuss first lines of poetry without mentioning Frosts The Road Not Taken, “Two roads diverged in a yellow wood” a personal favorite by a personal favorite. If you are interested in other wonderful first lines, check into some Dylan Thomas. For instance, his poem Lament begins with, “When I was a windy boy and a bit” and another called Poem On His Birthday starts with this line, “In the mustardseed sun,”
I agree that the first lines of poems can make or break a poet and a book of poetry for me. They are like the first chapter of a book. They draw you in. They should beckon to you, like a lighthouse on the shore after a terrible storm at sea.

To each the boulders that have fallen to each.
And some are loaves and some so nearly balls
We have to use a spell to make them balance:
'Stay where you are until our backs are turned!'

  • As the speaker and his neighbor walk the length of the wall, they pick up boulders along the way. Let’s say a boulder falls onto our speaker’s side of the wall – it’s his job to replace said boulder as they walk along. Our speaker begins to pay serious attention to these boulders. Some of them look like loaves of bread. Others look like perfectly formed tennis balls.
  • The point is that a lot of them are rounded, and our speaker and his neighbor have a difficult time putting these little boulders back into the wall. The boulders don’t really want to stay in the right place. We get the sense that the boulders roll off as soon as the speaker and his neighbor try to replace them.
  • We imagine that this process is like trying to repair a really crumbly cake you’ve just made – you keep trying to fix the sides with icing, but it keeps falling apart! Next time, add more butter.
  • The process of replacing the little boulders is so frustrating that the speaker and his neighbor resort to talking to the little rocks, and, in talking to them, they come up with a kind of spell. "Stay where you are until our backs our turned" doesn’t have quite the same ring to it as "bibbity, bobbity, boo," but we guess it will do in a pinch. We wonder why the spell isn’t simply, "Stay where you are!"
  • Why must the speaker and his neighbor wish the boulders to stay in the right place "until our backs are turned?" It’s as though the speaker and the neighbor surrender to the fact that the wall will fall apart again soon. They simply want the wall to stay intact in their presence.
  • We use spells all the time – spells like "turn green, turn green!" while waiting at a stoplight.

Written to his wife upon leaving for a trip abroad, Donne’s poem uses the literary concept of a “conceit,” an extended metaphor, to encourage his wife to see their momentary separation not as “A breach, but an expansion” of their love. Donne describes their relationship in terms of a drawing compass, her being the arm that is fixed in place and his as the arm extended outward, yet still connected. Donne’s masterful use of the English language, blended with emotional longing, makes “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning” one of the greatest love songs ever penned. Donne’s work is an excellent poem to read with your spouse or significant other.

Letters/Essays/Speeches: To The Right Honourable William, Earl of Dartmouth (Wheatley), Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God (Edwards), Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death (Henry), Gettysburg Address (Lincoln), I am alone (I am the last of my family) (Cochise), I Will Fight No More Forever(Chief Joseph), Ain’t I A Woman? (Truth), Solitude of Self (Stanton), Is it a Crime For A Citizen of the United States to Vote? (Anthony), The Negro Artist and The Racial Mountain (Hughes), I Have A Dream (King), Letter from a Birmingham Jail (King)

Mending wall poem essay

mending wall poem essay

Written to his wife upon leaving for a trip abroad, Donne’s poem uses the literary concept of a “conceit,” an extended metaphor, to encourage his wife to see their momentary separation not as “A breach, but an expansion” of their love. Donne describes their relationship in terms of a drawing compass, her being the arm that is fixed in place and his as the arm extended outward, yet still connected. Donne’s masterful use of the English language, blended with emotional longing, makes “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning” one of the greatest love songs ever penned. Donne’s work is an excellent poem to read with your spouse or significant other.

Media:

mending wall poem essaymending wall poem essaymending wall poem essaymending wall poem essay