Frank sinatra has a cold and other essays

After the 1942 recordings, Sinatra believed he needed to go solo, [79] with an insatiable desire to compete with Bing Crosby, [n] but he was hampered by his contract which gave Dorsey 43% of Sinatra's lifetime earnings in the entertainment industry. [80] A legal battle ensued, eventually settled in August 1943. [81] [o] On September 3, 1942, Dorsey bid farewell to Sinatra, reportedly saying as Sinatra left, "I hope you fall on your ass". [80] He replaced Sinatra with singer Dick Haymes . [65] Rumors began spreading in newspapers that Sinatra's mobster godfather, Willie Moretti , coerced Dorsey to let Sinatra out of his contract for a few thousand dollars, holding a gun to his head. [83] [p] Sinatra persuaded Stordahl to leave Dorsey with him and become his personal arranger, offering him $650 a month, five times the salary of Dorsey. [85] Dorsey and Sinatra, who had been very close, never patched up their differences before Dorsey's death in 1956, worsened by the fact that Dorsey occasionally made biting comments to the press such as "he's the most fascinating man in the world, but don't put your hand in the cage". [86]

Sinatra during a recording session in a studio at Capitol Records in 1953. Getty Images
“I have to be as good as or maybe better than every musician in the studio.” That was his goal. So he prepared himself. Frank greatest joy no doubt was his musical talent. He is best described as a highly intuitive, infinitely impatient thoroughbred. He didn’t read music but had an ear. He knew when someone was flat and he knew enough to change directors and composers and musical direction often so as not to get stale. “An audience is like a broad; if you’re indifferent, endsville.”

Frank sinatra has a cold and other essays

frank sinatra has a cold and other essays

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